Monday, September 27, 2010

Whale Watching in Depoe Bay Oregon




Whale Watching Report For Sept. 29
No whale watching today as the ocean was to rough, tomorrows weather looks much better as they are forecasting NE winds 5-10 knots, West swell 6'.

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 28
What a difference a day makes, no whale watching today due rough ocean conditions, visit Marine Weather Forecast

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 27
What a difference a day makes, we had absolutely great weather here on the coast with temperatures in the 80's. The whales did their job once again by giving the customers a fantastic show by coming up close to the boat on several occasions. Whales were sighted just North of South Point and and about 500 yards outside the entrance to the harbor.

Scientific name
Eschrichtius robustus (ess-SCHRICK-tee-yuss-roe-BUSS-tuss).
Named by J.E. Gray, means “Robustus” is Latin for “strong” or “robust.”

Description
Gray whales, the most commonly seen whales along the Oregon coast, are the most primitive of the baleen whales. Their average life expectancy is 50 years, but researchers have discovered a pregnant female estimated at more than 80 years old.

• Size: As adults, females are generally 45 feet long and weigh 35 tons. Mature males measure up to 35 feet long and weigh from 17-30 tons.

• Coloring: Ranges from mottled gray to black, covered with lighter colored abrasions, blotches, scars, white barnacles and orange whale lice. Some of the lighter coloring is natural, with scarring from barnacles, orca attacks, or encounters with boat propellers causing the remainder. Barnacles covering large areas of their heads and backs can make them appear almost white. These natural color patterns, barnacles and scarring from various sources make it possible to identify individual whales.

• Head: About one-fifth the body length. Appears V-shaped when viewed from above. Upper jaw is narrow and slightly arched. Two to five deep, broad furrows are in the region of the throat, allowing the mouth cavity to expand when feeding.

• Blowholes: When exhaling, sends spout of condensed air, or “blow,” 6 to 12 feet in the air. When whale is coming toward you or moving away, spout from its two blowholes can appear as a “V,” or heart- shaped.

• Dorsal Hump: Instead of a dorsal fin, the Gray whale has a dorsal hump and a series of 6 to 12 small humps called “knuckles” along the dorsal ridge to its tail.

• Tail: Measures as much as 10 feet across from tip to tip and is deeply notched in the center.

The gray whale is the most common large whale seen from shore along the coast of Depoe Bay. Gray whales are found off the Oregon coast all year. They feed in shallow water near shore during the summer and fall, migrate south for breeding and calving during the winter, and migrate north in the spring. The gray whale gets its name from its blotchy color pattern. Some of this pattern is present at birth, but most of it is caused by barnacles growing in the skin or by depigmented areas where barnacles have been.

Gray whales reach 45 feet in length and weigh 35 tons.  Adult females on average are larger than males. Whales are mammals. They are warm blooded, breathe air, have hair (single hairs around the front of the head that are visible on calves), and give birth to live young that suckle on milk from their mothers. Mid spring to mid fall is the gray whales feeding season. Most of the population spends this time in the Bering and Chukehi Seas off Alaska, although every summer some whales are observed feeding from British Columbia to Mexico. The summer population off the Oregon coast is about 200 to 400 animals, with many of the same individuals returning year after year. Summer feeding is better at higher latitudes because the long days produce lots of phytoplankton (small marine plants), which are eaten by zooplankton (small marine animals).

These are the basic food for all ocean life, stimulating the growth of the marine food web, including bottom-dwelling amphipods, the primary prey of gray whales. There are two basic types of whales: toothed and baleen. The gray whale is a baleen whale. Instead of true teeth, a row of 138-180 baleen plates grows along each side of the upper gum line. The baleen is made of material like a human fingernail. These are quite stiff and solid at its outer edge, each piece of baleen is “fringed” inside the mouth and tapers from 3 inches wide at the gum line to nearly a point at its bottom. These plates are separated by approximately ¼ inch inside the mouth, where their fringes overlap to form an effective screen.

Gray whales feed primarily on benthic (bottom-dwelling) amphipods (shrimp like animals). They go to the seafloor and suck up an area of the bottom about the size of a desktop and a foot deep. Sometimes this makes conspicuous pits on the bottom. The amphipods are trapped on the baleen filter inside the mouth, while mud, sand, and water pass between the baleen plates. This is the way the whale washes the amphipods clear of sand and mud. It then uses its tongue to suck the amphipods off the inside of the baleen fringe. Since gray whales filter animals from mud and water, their baleen is stiffer and has coarser fringes than that of other baleen whales.

Dockside Charters located in Depoe Bay, Oregon offers whale watching Zodiac Style aboard the Whales Tail. This is a very unique experience that gives you 360° viewing and puts you "up close and personal" for observing Oregon's resident gray whales. This is a great trip that is a little more personal and gives you and your family an adventure that is not to be missed. Here you can enjoy the incredible scenery of the Oregon Coast, transit the worlds smallest navigable channel, and enjoy watching gray whales, harbor seals, sea lions, and other marine life. We try to provide you with a once in a lifetime experience that is not to be missed along with some great memories.

Something new this year we are offering are sweatshirts that have our Whales Tail logo on the back, different colors and sizes are available.

For more information about us and Whale Watching visit: Whale Watching on the Whales Tail

Thank you for visiting our web site, we hope to see you aboard the Whales Tail.

Dockside Charters
270 Coast Guard Pl.
Depoe Bay, Oregon 97341

Phone: 541-765-2545
Toll Free: 1-800-733-8915

Thursday, September 23, 2010

Oregon Coast Whale Watching Tours




Whale Watching Zodiac Style on the Whales Tail

Video's of this trip coming soon

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 25
We had great whale sightings today just South of the #2 red bell buoy, we were only able to get in two trips today as the ocean conditions deteriorated due to a large swell. The next few days look to be the same with hazardous sea conditions forecasted.

Dockside Charters located in Depoe Bay, Oregon offers whale watching Zodiac Style aboard the Whales Tail. This is a very unique experience that gives you 360° viewing and puts you "up close and personal" for observing Oregon's resident gray whales. This is a great trip that is a little more personal and gives you and your family an adventure that is not to be missed. Here you can enjoy the incredible scenery of the Oregon Coast, transit the worlds smallest navigable channel, and enjoy watching gray whales, harbor seals, sea lions, and other marine life. We try to provide you with a once in a lifetime experience that is not to be missed along with some great memories.

Something new this year we are offering are sweatshirts that have our Whales Tail logo on the back, different colors and sizes are available.

For more information about Zodiac Style Whale Watching visit: Whales Tail

Thank you for visiting our web site, we hope to see you aboard the Whales Tail.

Dockside Charters
270 Coast Guard Pl.
Depoe Bay, Oregon 97341

Phone: 541-765-2545
Toll Free: 1-800-733-8915

Monday, September 20, 2010

Depoe Bay Whale Watching






















Whale Watching Report For Sept. 22
Today was a perfect day on the ocean, very light winds and 2-3' swells with warm temperatures. We had fantastic whale sightings today on the Whales Tail, on all the trips we whales coming up close to the boat on numerous occasions. There were 6-8 whales in the area from Whale Cove to Goverment Point and they all put on a great show for the customers. I will have pictures and video of todays trips posted soon.

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 21
The ocean conditions were beautiful today as we had light winds and sea conditions under partly sunny skies. Today whales were sighted anywhere from just outside the harbor entrance to Goverment Point. All the whales seemed to be moving around alot looking for food. As of this evening the weather looks good through Friday, but by this weekend we may see increasing swell conditions as a low pressure system builds off the coast.

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 20
Today the ocean settled down and the rains stopped which made for a pleasant day whale watching. We sighted whales anywhere between North Point and Goverment. All the whales were in close to shore feeding. Tomorrow and Wednesday's weather looks good as they are forecasting light winds and sea conditions.

Dockside Charters located in Depoe Bay, Oregon offers whale watching Zodiac Style aboard the Whales Tail. This is a very unique experience that gives you 360° viewing and puts you "up close and personal" for observing Oregon's resident gray whales. This is a great trip that is a little more personal and gives you and your family an adventure that is not to be missed. Here you can enjoy the incredible scenery of the Oregon Coast, transit the worlds smallest navigable channel, and enjoy watching gray whales, harbor seals, sea lions, and other marine life. We try to provide you with a once in a lifetime experience that is not to be missed along with some great memories.

Whale Bits
A small percentage of Gray whales feed off the coast of Depoe Bay in the summer. Their primary food source is mysid shrimp, which swarm in abundance near the bottom of the kelp beds. During this shallow water feeding behavior, watchers can often see one half of the tail fluke above water while the whale is head down in a kelp bed. The half fluke looks very much like a shark fin. Records from the whaling industry indicate that this species usually does not feed during its migration or winter calving periods. They can lose up to 30 percent of their body weight between feeding seasons. Whales have been observed coming to the surface with mud streaming from their baleen in the calving areas and along the migration route. Such behavior may indicate attempts at feeding or training the calves to feed.

Gray whales are noted for their protective behavior toward their calves. They were called “devil fish” by early Yankee whalers who had their ships rammed and sometimes sunk after the whalers harpooned a calf to entice the mother closer. Now they are considered the “friendliest” of whales, often curiously approaching anglers and whale watching boats. When a Gray whale comes to the surface, its blow or spout is a double-plumed, misty jet of vapor, rising 6 to 12 feet, that can often be seen against the horizon. The blow is not a fountain of water, but a mist of condensed warm moist air exhaled under high pressure from the lungs. The whale can expel 100 gallons of air in a single blast.

Generally, gray whales are slow swimmers, averaging three to five mph during migration. They have a rhythmic breathing pattern. Normally they will make three to five short, shallow dives of less than a minute each and then a long, deep dive. A general rule is one short dive and a blow for every minute spent in a deep dive. This repeated breathing pattern enables the whales to store up oxygen and get rid of carbon dioxide built up during a long dive. In a single breath, 80 to 90 percent of the air in their lungs is exchanged compared to 10 to 20 percent in land mammals.

Feeding dives may range from 3 minutes up to 15 minutes. They can stay under water for 30 minutes if they need to. If they are frightened, they can hide on the bottom or travel great distances underwater. Sometimes they dive and reappear a quarter of a mile away. Whales have the largest brain of any animal on earth. They are curious and often seen “spyhopping”, or lifting their heads above the surface of the water. They like to rise up and get a better look at their surroundings. When a Gray whale lifts its tail flukes out of the water, it is going into a deep dive. This action, called sounding or fluking, helps propel the whale downward at a steep angle to the bottom where they feed on small crustaceans. After the flukes disappear under the water, the turbulence of the dive will cause a circle of smooth water, known as a fluke-print.

The ultimate in whale sightings is a breach, which occurs when a whale launches as much as ¾ of its body out of the water in a spectacular show of power and grace. Scientists are not sure why whales breach. They speculate that they do it to remove parasites, communicate with each other, or just do it for fun. Gray whales are not known for breaching nearly as often as their cousins, the humpback. Young Gray whales seen along the Oregon coast seem to breach the most frequently.

For more information about us visit: Depoe Bay Whale Watching

Something new this year we are offering are sweatshirts that have our Whales Tail logo on the back, different colors and sizes are available.

Thank you for visiting our web site, we hope to see you aboard the Whales Tail.

Dockside Charters
270 Coast Guard Pl.
Depoe Bay, Oregon 97341

Phone: 541-765-2545
Toll Free: 1-800-733-8915

Friday, September 17, 2010

Oregon Whale Watching Tours




Whale Watching Zodiac Style on the Whales Tail

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 19
Although the wind did come this afternoon we still had good whale sightings just outside the harbor entrance. There were four different whales in the area today, all of them seemed to be moving around alot, possibly looking for food.

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 18
We had fantastic whale sightings today North and South of the harbor entrance, the whales gave us a great performance. We started the day with nice weather but it took a turn for the worse as the rain, wind and seas picked up which made the ocean conditions rough. Hopefully things will improve for tomorrow.

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 17
We had excellent whale sightings today just outside the harbor entrance, there were at least five whales in the area. Although we had light rain showers off and on today the whales gave everybody a fantastic show by coming up close to the boat on numerous occasions.

About Gray Whales
The gray whale is the most common large whale seen from shore along the coast of Depoe Bay. Gray whales are found off the Oregon coast all year. They feed in shallow water near shore during the summer and fall, migrate south for breeding and calving during the winter, and migrate north in the spring. The gray whale gets its name from its blotchy color pattern. Some of this pattern is present at birth, but most of it is caused by barnacles growing in the skin or by depigmented areas where barnacles have been.

Gray whales can reach 48 feet in length and weigh 35 tons. Whales are mammals. They are warm blooded, breathe air, have hair (single hairs around the front of the head that are visible on calves), and give birth to live young that suckle on milk from their mothers. Mid spring to mid fall is the gray whales feeding season. Most of the population spends this time in the Bering and Chukehi Seas off Alaska, although every summer some whales are observed feeding from British Columbia to Mexico. The summer population off the Oregon coast is about 200 to 400 animals, with many of the same individuals returning year after year to Depoe Bay. Summer feeding is better at higher latitudes because the long days produce lots of phytoplankton (small marine plants), which are eaten by zooplankton (small marine animals).

These are the basic food for all ocean life, stimulating the growth of the marine food web, including bottom-dwelling amphipods, the primary prey of gray whales. There are two basic types of whales, toothed and baleen. The gray whale is a baleen whale. Instead of teeth, a row of 138-180 baleen plates grows along each side of the upper gum line. The baleen is made of material like a human fingernail. These are quite stiff and solid at its outer edge, each piece of baleen is “fringed” inside the mouth and tapers from 3 inches wide at the gum line to nearly a point at its bottom. These plates are separated by approximately ¼ inch inside the mouth, where their fringes overlap to form an effective screen.

Gray whales feed primarily on benthic (bottom-dwelling) amphipods (shrimp like animals). They go to the seafloor and suck up an area of the bottom about the size of a desktop and a foot deep. Sometimes this makes conspicuous pits on the bottom. The amphipods are trapped on the baleen filter inside the mouth, while mud, sand, and water pass between the baleen plates. This is the way the whale washes the amphipods clear of sand and mud. It then uses its tongue to suck the amphipods off the inside of the baleen fringe. Since gray whales filter animals from mud and water, their baleen is stiffer and has coarser fringes than that of other baleen whales.

Dockside Charters located in Depoe Bay, Oregon offers whale watching zodiac style aboard the Whales Tail. This is a very unique experience that gives you 360° viewing and puts you "up close and personal" for observing Oregon's resident gray whales. This is a great trip that is a little more personal and gives you and your family an adventure that is not to be missed. Here you can enjoy the incredible scenery of the Oregon Coast, transit the worlds smallest navigable channel, and enjoy watching gray whales, harbor seals, sea lions, and other marine life. We try to provide you with a once in a lifetime experience that is not to be missed along with some great memories.

For more information about us visit: Whale Watching on the Whales Tail

Something new this year we are offering are sweatshirts that have our Whales Tail logo on the back, different colors and sizes are available.

Thank you for visiting our web site, we hope to see you aboard the Whales Tail.

Dockside Charters
270 Coast Guard Pl.
Depoe Bay, Oregon 97341

Phone: 541-765-2545
Toll Free: 1-800-733-8915

Monday, September 13, 2010

Oregon Coast Whale Watching Tours





Whale Watching Report For Sept. 15
We had great whale sightings this morning as whales were sighted just outside the harbor entrance and North and South of Depoe Bay. The winds and rain did increase this afternoon which made the ocean conditions choppy.

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 14
We had fantastic ocean conditions today, no wind, with a 2' swell, although we did have some fog we were still able to find the whales and they put on a fabulous show. The whales were busy feeding and rolling on the surface as they were heading down to feed. On several occasion you could see their tail swirling on top of the water and just below the surface of the water, it's a really cool sight if you haven't seen this behavior before. Tomorrow the weather may turn on us and get windy, 20-25 knots by the afternoon, so if you are planning on going tomorrow it would be best to go before noon.

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 13
We had a beautiful day here on the coast with sunny skies and warm temperatures. The whales once again put on a great show for the people by coming up to the boat for a closer look. Whales were sighted between North Point and Goverment Point in close to shore feeding.

Dockside Charters located in Depoe Bay, Oregon offers whale watching zodiac style aboard the Whales Tail. This is a very unique experience that gives you 360° viewing and puts you "up close and personal" for observing Oregon's resident gray whales. This is a great trip that is a little more personal and gives you and your family an adventure that is not to be missed. Here you can enjoy the incredible scenery of the Oregon Coast, transit the worlds smallest navigable channel, and enjoy watching gray whales, harbor seals, sea lions, and other marine life. We try to provide you with a once in a lifetime experience that is not to be missed along with some great memories.

For more information about us visit: Zodiac Style Whale Watching

Book your Trip in Advance
If you would like to make a reservation see top of this page and you can E-mail me at: garybosn@gmail.com I will get back to you as soon as possible.

Something new this year we are offering are sweatshirts that have our Whales Tail logo on the back, different colors and sizes are available.

Thank you for visiting our web site, we hope to see you aboard the Whales Tail.

Dockside Charters
270 Coast Guard Pl.
Depoe Bay, Oregon 97341

Phone: 541-765-2545
Toll Free: 1-800-733-8915

Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Whale Watching Tours on the Oregon Coast



Whale Watching Report For Sept. 12
We had another fantastic day here on the coast with tempetures in the 70's and beautiful ocean conditions. Whales were sighted from North Point to Goverment Point in close to shore feeding, and they put on a great show for the people. Tomorrows weather looks to be much the same as today, so we hope you will join us on the Whales Tail for some enjoyable whale watching zodiac style.

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 11
Today was a repeat of yesterday, fantastic weather, beautiful ocean conditions and great whale watching. We had whales out front of the harbor entrance, North and South of Depoe Bay. All in all it was a perfect day here on the coast. We hope you will join us on the Whales Tail, its a great ride along with awesome whale sightings.

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 10
This was one of those days when you should have been here on the coast, warm temperatures, and beautiful ocean conditions. Whale sightings were fantastic with sightings just outside the harbor entrance and anywhere from Whale Cove to Goverment Point. The whales put on a great show coming up close to the boat on several occasions. We hope you will join us this weekend for some great whale watching zodiac style aboard the Whales Tail.

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 9
We had about the same ocean conditions today as yesterday. We had good whale sightings just outside the harbor entrance, the whales seemed to be moving around alot which tells me they were busy looking for food. The weather still looks good through the weekend, we hope you will join us on the Whales Tail.

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 8
We had overcast skies today and the ocean conditions remain good with light winds and sea conditions, the next five days look to be much the same. We had excellent whale sightings today, whales were sighted just outside the harbor entrance and to the North off Pirates Cove and Goverment Point. There was one very large whale sighted off Pirates Cove, I have seen this whale only once before, about 3 weeks ago off Otter Rock, this whale is very impressive looking. Hope you will join us on a exciting whale watching trip zodiac style on the Whales Tail.

Dockside Charters located in Depoe Bay, Oregon offers whale watching zodiac style aboard the Whales Tail. This is a very unique experience that gives you 360° viewing and puts you "up close and personal" for observing Oregon's resident gray whales. This is a great trip that is a little more personal and gives you and your family an adventure that is not to be missed. Here you can enjoy the incredible scenery of the Oregon Coast, transit the worlds smallest navigable channel, and enjoy watching gray whales, harbor seals, sea lions, and other marine life. We try to provide you with a once in a lifetime experience that is not to be missed along with some great memories.

I have been involved in the maritime industry for 40 years and recently retired from Oregon State University Research Ship "Wecoma" which included scientific research of whales to sampling the bottom of the ocean to name a few. I hold 13 endorsements on my Coast Guard license including Celestial Navigation, Radar and Global Maritime Distress and Safety. We were the first and original zodiac style whale watching boat on the Oregon Coast. We have been inspected and have all the latest safety equipment. I hope you will join us on a exciting whale watching excursion aboard the Whales Tail.


For more information about us visit: Zodiac Style Whale Watching on the Whales Tail

Book your Trip in Advance
If you would like to make a reservation see top of this page and you can E-mail me at: garybosn@gmail.com I will get back to you as soon as possible.

Something new this year we are offering are sweatshirts that have our Whales Tail logo on the back, different colors and sizes are available.

Thank you for visiting our web site, we hope to see you aboard the Whales Tail.

Dockside Charters
270 Coast Guard Pl.
Depoe Bay, Oregon 97341

Phone: 541-765-2545
Toll Free: 1-800-733-8915

Sunday, September 5, 2010

Depoe Bay Whale Watching Tours




Whale Watching Report For Sept. 6
Today was the day to be here on the coast, the ocean conditions were absolutely beautiful, no wind, 3' swell, and warm sunny skies, no need for a coat today. The whales put on a great show coming up close to the boat on numerous occasions, taking a real good look at all the people. I'll have pictures and video posted in the next day or so, it was a fantastic Labor Day weekend. September is usually a good weather month here on the coast as is the whale watching, we hope you will join for a exciting whale watching trip.

Dockside Charters located in Depoe Bay, Oregon offers whale watching zodiac style aboard the Whales Tail. This is a very unique experience that gives you 360° viewing and puts you "up close and personal" for observing Oregon's resident gray whales. This is a great trip that is a little more personal and gives you and your family an adventure that is not to be missed. Here you can enjoy the incredible scenery of the Oregon Coast, transit the worlds smallest navigable channel, and enjoy watching gray whales, harbor seals, sea lions, and other marine life. We try to provide you with a once in a lifetime experience that is not to be missed along with some great memories.

Comfort and Safety
Lately I have been asked are inflatable boats safe and stable, the answer is yes. Inflatable boats are said to be the safest and most stable boats in the world today with all the new construction methods, technology and the new designs allowing necessary safety systems to be in place. Because of their safety reputation, inflatable boats are now the standard for use by the Coast Guard, military and other agencies because of its speed, maneuverability, and safe stable ride.

When you first think about it, you might wonder if an inflatable boat is as safe as a larger fiberglass or wood boat. The fact is inflatable boats are just as safe as larger boats, and in some cases they are safer. Inflatable boats are more buoyant because of the inflatable collar or tubes. These inflatable sections help spread the buoyancy out over the entire boat. Also, the collars or tubes on an inflatable boat are usually designed with separate chambers. This means that if one chamber becomes deflated, the overall buoyancy will not be noticeably affected.

A concern that some people have when they are considering an inflatable boat over a larger boat for whale watching is the stability of the inflatable. This is a common question of some people, the fact is, the inflatable boat is much more stable than a larger boat. This is a great feature for people who might be a little bit nervous about going out on a inflatable boat. One indication that inflatable boats are safe is that they are preferred by the Coast Guard as offshore rescue vessels. The one reason the Coast Guard prefers these boats is because they are stable and handle better in rough water. Unlike most larger boats, an inflatable boat sits flat on the water and has a low center of gravity, which means they don’t roll like the larger boats and you won't get seasick.

For more information about us visit: Whale Watching on the Whales Tail

Book your Trip in Advance
If you would like to make a reservation see top of this page and you can E-mail me at: garybosn@gmail.com I will get back to you as soon as possible.

Something new this year we are offering are sweatshirts that have our Whales Tail logo on the back, different colors and sizes are available.

Thank you for visiting our web site, we hope to see you aboard the Whales Tail.

Dockside Charters
270 Coast Guard Pl.
Depoe Bay, Oregon 97341

Phone: 541-765-2545
Toll Free: 1-800-733-8915

Friday, September 3, 2010

Whale Watching in Depoe Bay Oregon






































































































Above are just some of the recent pictures taken the last couple days aboard the Whales Tail

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 4
We had good ocean conditions and great weather here on the coast with sunny skies all day. The whales were here all day both North and South of the harbor entrance, we even sighted whales just outside the harbor. Once again all the whales seemed to be moving around alot looking for food.

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 3
Today we started out with bright sunny skies and warm temperatures but by this afternoon we were cooler and had cloudy conditions. We had good whale sightings just outside the entrance to the harbor as the whales were feeding in close to the shoreline.

Whale Watching Report For Sept. 2
We have had great whale watching the last month and yesterday we were treated to some Fin Whales that showed up about 5 miles offshore, I hope to have the video posted soon. We are still having good sightings of Gray Whales and they always seem to put on a good performance for the people by coming up close to the boat for a better look. We hope you will join us this Holiday weekend on the Whales Tail for a exciting whale watching excursion Zodiac Style.

Dockside Charters located in Depoe Bay, Oregon offers whale watching zodiac style aboard the Whales Tail. This is a very unique experience that gives you 360° viewing and puts you "up close and personal" for observing Oregon's resident gray whales. This is a great trip that is a little more personal and gives you and your family an adventure that is not to be missed. Here you can enjoy the incredible scenery of the Oregon Coast, transit the worlds smallest navigable channel, and enjoy watching gray whales, harbor seals, sea lions, and other marine life. We try to provide you with a once in a lifetime experience that is not to be missed along with some great memories.

If you would like to make a reservation see top of this page and you can E-mail me at: garybosn@gmail.com I will get back to you as soon as possible.

Something new this year we are offering are sweatshirts that have our Whales Tail logo on the back, different colors and sizes are available.

Thank you for visiting our website, we hope to see you aboard the Whales Tail.

Dockside Charters
270 Coast Guard Pl.
Depoe Bay, Oregon 97341

Phone: 541-765-2545
Toll Free: 1-800-733-8915
 
google200096da794a1a23.html